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MicroPython

Tags: #<Tag:0x00007f1bd70c97f8>

Interesting:

“MicroPython is a lean and efficient implementation of the Python 3 programming language that includes a small subset of the Python standard library and is optimised to run on microcontrollers and in constrained environments.”

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Been around for many years.

Delete the thread then, if you feel it’s inappropriate.

No, just saying it isn’t new. What application were you thinking it could be for?

I didn’t say it was.

I didn’t have anything in mind, but I thought - obviously you didn’t - that somebody who might prefer coding in Python would like a STM32 development board with ADCs & DACs on it, and they might not have come across it.

I think the trick is to always reply to a thread with the least constructive comment one can think of !

p.s. I find micropython v. interesting. it’s developed by Adafruit, I personally really like their work, apparently they’ve poured a lot of money into developing it and I think it shows. However, despite their claim of it’s efficiency, it’s actually not so speedy compared to machine code like c/c++. So heavy duty ADC use and maths like we’re doing with emonstm32 would be out of the question at present. An advantage of upython not often mentioned, I’ve been told, apart from easy learning and it’s networking libraries, is updatability, with easier rollback in case of a breaking change.

emonstm32 needs a development guide. Unfortunately there’s not much we can do in regards to the programming language… someone has to learn the basics of C at least. An emonstm32 development guide would have to introduce someone to the structure of the libraries and much more.

General purpose stm32 development and upython seem to be very much hand in hand. I wonder if there’s anyone out there with experience deploying larger-scale using this.

I had to get to the end of this thread before I realized that it’s tagged Hardware and isn’t actually about micropython at all but rather about the pyboard.

To which I add, any flavour of Raspberry pi will run Python 3 quite happily, so it’s quite a restricted market I would have thought.